TX Active Cement| Heidelberg Materials North America
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TX Active® Concrete that cleans itself and the environment

 

Harness the self-cleaning and eco-friendly power of TX Active® Photocatalytic Cement

 

Mary Bartelme Park tx active

 

Greenspace Redefined:

Mary Bartelme Park, Chicago

At the heart of Chicago’s Mary Bartelme Park lie gleaming steel sculptures and a radiant white plaza paved with TX Active® photocatalytic cement. Not only do these pavers maintain their brilliant white hue, reducing cleaning and maintenance costs, but they also actively combat air pollution. Crafted by Unilock® Chicago, the plaza stands as a testament to innovation in green design. Opened in 2010, this park is named in honor of Mary Bartelme, Illinois’s first female high-court judge and a champion for children’s welfare.

TX Active®: A beacon of eco-conscious design that goes beyond just aesthetics.

 

A Beacon of Faith and Innovation:

LDS Temple, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

T he Church of Latter Day Saints’ temples, renowned for their pristine white brilliance, have a new addition in Quetzaltenango. Harnessing the power of TX Active® photocatalytic cement, this sacred structure’s intricate relief details and exterior will remain untarnished by atmospheric elements. This choice ensures the temple’s exterior will continually gleam, reflecting both its spiritual and architectural significance.

TX Active®: Elevating design while combatting air pollution.

 

LDS Temple, Quetzaltenango tx active

Empower your architectural vision

Resources tailored for visionary architects

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AEC Daily Course

This course examines photocatalytic technology which accelerates self-cleaning and fights air pollution while maintaining the mechanical and physical properties of traditional concrete.

Nashville Courthouse

 

Good, Clean Design

For more than a decade, our technology center has been studying photocatalysis and applying its applications in cementitious materials. Among our findings: cementitious materials represent the ideal solution for spreading photocatalysts widely and evenly over both the horizontal and vertical surfaces of architectural and structural elements.